The Persephone Syndrome

She pleads to her mother on
the telephone- across the wires that span
the oceans between them (and she would
walk the high wire to her if there was one.)
But her mother tells her this is the way
it’s going to be, and she just has to give
him more time, and she will get used to
married life.
But, she hates him already- his mannerisms
at the dinner table (she can’t stand the
smacking), the way he can’t even reverse
his crusty inside out socks before she
has to do the laundry, and the way he
can be entertained by a video game all night.
She feels like she is going to be sick again.
They already upped her Paxil about a month ago
when her husband came home to her cutting up
his favorite afghan his grandmother had made.
She just wishes Mother was there to wash her
hair tonight.
She tells her mother good night, hangs up the phone,
finds the scissors and decides it’s time
for a haircut.

This was inspired by a prompt here: http://magalyguerrero.com/fictitious-afflictions-symptoms-dark-poetry-for-the-cruellest-month-2016-day-8/ which was to Write a poem that illustrates the symptoms of a quirky made up illness. I actually googled “persephone syndrome” and I did find some results pertaining to Greek married women who had a strong mother attachment, and would become “neurotic, anxious, and/or depressed” in their marriages.

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8 Comments

  1. Rosemary Nissen-Wade

     /  April 18, 2016

    All too common, I fear.

    Reply
  2. georginamorley

     /  April 19, 2016

    That is such a great piece….even those of us without the “mother Attachment” can appreciate the crusty sock issue lol 😀 XXX

    Reply
  3. Khaya Ronkainen

     /  April 19, 2016

    This is lovely, a great depiction of mundane tasks and little annoyances. But strong mother attachment is hilarious, love the name of the syndrome too. It’s easy to remember 🙂

    Reply
  4. Those crusty socks can nudge the best of us towards thoughts of bonfires on the backyard. And our mother figure dancing around the flames that devour gross habits.

    I really like this. Not just the eccentricity of the ailment, but also the way in which your poem shows us the hurt and discontentment that lies under the quirk.

    Reply
  5. That is an odd affliction – and yet it’s real! Usually quirky poems feel upbeat to me but this has just the right note of melancholy for the topic.

    Reply
  6. Ha! Love this. The description of the crusty socks really got me!

    Reply
  7. This is such a splendid piece of work 😀

    Reply

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